Check out the top eighteen pictures entered by the general public, BBSRC-researchers, and students and pick your favourite images that represented how life sciences are changing the world in areas like: food, farming, bioenergy, biotech, industry and health.

Support your favourite pictures in each division and give them your vote.

The image with the most votes in each division will win the Division Winner prize of £400. The Division Winners will then go head to head at the Great British Bioscience Festival in London, where visitors will decide who will be the Overall Winner!

Voting will close on the 31 October.

For more amazing bioscience pictures visit: http://bbsrc.tumblr.com/

Public Division

  • Ian Newtonvote for this image
    Scientific description
    Fluorescently labeled microtubules prepared for an in vitro binding assay, as per Hyman, A.A. et al. 1991, encountered obstructions on a slide causing this Edvard munch-like image.
    This is a joint entry in collaboration with Dr. Paul L. Appleton.
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    Microtubules In Vitro by Ian Newton

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  • kevin rangeleyvote for this image

    P8066846 by Kevin Rangeley

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  • Laurie Knightvote for this image
    Scientific description
    Long legged fly (Dolichopodidae) portrait
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    Long Legged Fly by Laurie Knight

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  • David Crossleyvote for this image
    Scientific description
    Mantis
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    Mantis by David Crossley

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  • Anai Gonzalez Corderovote for this image
    Scientific description
    Circular reconstructions with immunofluorescent images of human embryonic stem cell- derived eye cells. The retinal pigment epithelium cells depicted here are essential for vision and were stained for various markers.

    Kaledoscopic Eyes by Anai Gonzalez Cordero

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  • William Richardsonvote for this image
    Scientific description
    European honey bee (Apis mellifera)
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    The Pollinator by William Richardson

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BBSRC-researcher Division

  • David Widdickvote for this image
    Scientific description
    Actinomycetes derived from a flower bed soil sample. These bacteria are the source of many antibiotics. The photos illustrate the wide range of beautiful colony shapes produced by these organisms.
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    Life In Earth by David Widdick

    Entered in the Research Division

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  • carmen nueno-palopvote for this image
    Scientific description
    Electron microscopy image of Ncyc1026 Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Brewing Strain. The image shows a Yeast cell with a bud and scar buds from previous cell divisions. The image it has been coloured with Photoshop
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    Ncyc1026 Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Brewing Strain by Carmen Nueno Palop

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  • Tom Mathesonvote for this image
    Scientific description
    As part of our BBSRC-funded research into the neuromechanical control of aimed limb movements in insects, we analysed the development and functions of touch-sensitive hairs on the wings of locusts. Stimulation of these tiny hairs signals the 'target' at which the locust aims a movement of its hind leg. Dark pigmented patches and an intricate tracery of wing veins on the adult forewing form an intriguing pattern in this low power view lit by oblique blue light.

    Blue Wing by Tom Matheson

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  • Jill Harrisonvote for this image
    Scientific description
    In plants the overall shape reflects the pattern of branching, the pattern of leaf initiation and the relative growth of leaves initiated from the growing tip. These traits impact strongly on plant productivity because they affect light interception during photosynthesis. The aquatic algal relatives of the land were constrained to filamentous or mat-like planar forms, and a capacity to generate upright leafy shoots was gained as plants colonized land. This evolutionary transition is mirrored during normal development in modern mosses when leafy shoots initiate from a filamentous precursor tissue. Our lab aims to understand the developmental and genetic changes that allowed plants to gain new growth habits and radiate on land. This image shows the tip of a moss shoot in which the triangular apical stem cell has been exposed due to a hormone treatment that prevents leaves from developing. Our results suggest a key role for plant hormones in the evolution of shoots and leaves. The image was taken with a Zeiss confocal laser scanning microscope and our work is funded by the BBSRC (BB/L00224811).
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    Apical Growth In A Moss by Jill Harrison

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  • M K Hajihosseinivote for this image
    Scientific description
    Beautiful organisation of inter-costal muscles around ribs in the chest wall of a mouse embryo
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    Rib And Muscle by M K Hajihosseini

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  • Etheresia Pretoriusvote for this image
    Scientific description
    This is a scanning electron microscope micrograph take at 30 000x machine magnification, from a red blood cell, surrounded by fibrin fibres, of a healthy 63-year old male.
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    Healthy Red Blood Cell In Fibrin Fibres by Etheresia Pretorius

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Student Division

  • Declan Kingvote for this image
    Scientific description
    Caption: Microscope image of the complex networks established between nerve cells from a mouse grown in the laboratory. The cells labelled green are neurons, which are specialised cells capable of transmitting information throughout the body. The red cells are astrocytes which support neuronal growth.
    Imaging modality: Zeiss LSM710 Laser Scanning Confocal Microscope (Robert Fleming)
    Credit: Declan King

    Primary Hippocampal Neurons by Declan King

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  • Alexander Hackmannvote for this image
    Scientific description
    In the course of evolution insects have developed a variety of strategies to reduce surface contamination, which can inhibit physiological functions. For example, many insects regularly clean their antennae with a specialized cleaning device on their front legs. My PhD project focuses on understanding the underlying biomechanics of these cleaning structures. This colourized Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) Image shows a 10 µm polystyrene particle (five times smaller than the diameter of a human hair) covered with smaller particles, which is attached to a cleaning hair after its removal from a Camponotus rufifemur ant´s antenna. So far nothing is known about the forces acting between the cleaning hairs and the particles to be cleaned. This is the first time that a SEM image shows adhesion between a single cleaning hair and a contaminant.
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    Scanning Electron Microscopy Of A Polystyrene Particle Attached To A Cleaning Hair Of An Ant by Alexander Hackmann

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  • Dp Hopkinsvote for this image
    Scientific description
    A pea aphid wired up to an electronic penetration graph, a method for record aphid feed behavior using electrical currents.
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    Wired For Life by Dp Hopkins

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  • Luke Braidwoodvote for this image
    Scientific description
    A farmer surveys the impact of Maize Lethal Necrosis (MLN) upon his farm in Machakos, Kenya. Maize Chlorotis Mottle Virus (MCMV) was reported in Kenya in 2011. Since then it has been reported in Tanzania, Ethiopia, Uganda, Rwanda, and the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Mixed infection of MCMV with Potyviridae members results in MLN, which is causing yield losses of 100%.
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    Assessing The Damage by Luke Braidwood

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  • Yale Brewervote for this image
    Scientific description
    Harvesting at its most efficient to feed the worlds demand for wheat with clean power generated by wind turbines in the distance
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    Food & Power by Yale Brewer

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  • Laurence Jacksonvote for this image
    Scientific description
    The heart is an extraordinarily complex muscle, providing the circulation of blood throughout the body. Both the muscular action which pumps the blood as well as the electrical pacing of these contractions depends heavily on the highly ordered muscle fibre architecture. This image was created using Diffusion Tensor Magnetic Resonance Imaging, which uses the movement of water along these fibres to determine their orientation.
    The image shows the spiral structure of the myofibres around the left ventricular chamber, note that the inside and outside walls of the chamber spiral in different directions, contraction along these fibres causes an upwards twisting motion reducing the volume of the chamber and expelling the blood.
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    Muscle Fibres Of The Heart by Laurence Jackson

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